I Suppose a Kick in the Butt is Better than a Kick in the Head

I Suppose a Kick in the Butt is Better than a Kick in the Head

Boy with Animals, Else Berg

I Suppose a Kick in the Butt is Better than a Kick in the Head

Rabbit might look frightened, but that’s because he’s worried for me. I’m sure Mama wonders why I cry every day at naptime, but it’s not out of loneliness. Rabbit understands. Somehow, he managed to get out of the crib, where Donkey can’t reach him.

I never have to worry at bedtime. By the end of the day, Donkey is too tired to cause any trouble, and he usually falls asleep before I do. But this is naptime, and he’s up to his usual games.

Donkey likes to bray in my ear. When I try to ignore him, he kicks me. He’s smart, too. He makes sure to kick me through my diaper, so he doesn’t leave a mark. I’m really tired in the afternoon, but it’s so hard to fall asleep with all that braying and kicking.

And then there’s Cow. Maybe she means well. Maybe she’s trying to make up for Donkey’s games, but licking my face all the time is no help. She has to have the roughest tongue I’ve ever felt.

Rabbit usually escapes torment by burrowing in the blankets. I’m glad he got out, today. I sure wish he would go and get Mama.

Or, consider this last paragraph (for 199 words), more in line with Jane’s sinister mind:
Rabbit usually escapes torment by burrowing in the blankets. I’m glad he got out, today. Β Wait, is that a steak knife he’s holding?

For Jane Dougherty’s Microfiction Challenge #6: The child, she provides a painting by Else Berg, Boy with Animals, and the theme loneliness. I was able to keep the word count toΒ 200 words.
Of course, Jane’s critique is welcome.

Image source: Wikipedia

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “I Suppose a Kick in the Butt is Better than a Kick in the Head

  1. I loved it. I’ve written about the very real stuffed animals in our house (my husband and I still quote Humpty and Ahh Bear). Fortunately, there were no sinister ones–that I know about. πŸ™‚

    Like

  2. Pingback: Microfiction challenge The child: the entries – Jane Dougherty Writes

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s