Fading Light

Fading Light

Fading Light

There is madness in the
darkness fallen on this land.
Can any man hold
a lantern
high enough to waken
the masses seemingly
asleep?

Until it dawns
on them, the air will foul,
no stream will run clear,
toil will bring no reward,
fewer will be able
to stand tall,
while the fewest profit.

Can any woman stir
the fire that steams
as it’s flooded with rhetoric
designed to placate
while smothering those who
stoked it out of frustration?

It has begun,
and will become a long night
until eyes are open to the fact
that, ineptly, to conserve
means to preserve
the elite in their effort to
keep us in the dark.

The optional prompt at NaPoWriMo 2017 for Day 17 of National Poetry Writing Month/Global Poetry Writing Month is to write a nocturne.

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Midway

Midway.png

Midway

A nest is empty
Next season, hungry,
upturned mouths wait

Life in stages,
never complete

Bridges crossed,
or burning
Byways,
with no direct route

Here
There

No true beginning
No real end
No one path

The optional prompt at NaPoWriMo 2017 for Day 15 of National Poetry Writing Month/Global Poetry Writing Month is to write a poem that reflects on the nature of being in the middle of something.

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A Few Clerihew

Edmund Clerihew Bentley
Created this form and wrote plenty
To describe folks in verse
With just four lines, quite terse

Carl Sagan
Could talk hours and hours on
Stars, comets and planets,
His knowledge as good as it gets

The Donald,
Far from reticent, but disgruntled,
Out-bluffed all the rest:
He is (not) the person they guessed

 

The optional prompt from NaPoWriPo 2017 for Day 14 of National Poetry Writing Month/Global Poetry Writing Month is to write a clerihew.
 
Clerihew
~ often silly, were first devised by Edmund Clerihew Bentley
~ the first line is the name of the subject (usually famous)
~ subject is placed in an absurd light, or with unknown or spurious attributes
~ rhyme scheme AABB, and often forced
~ irregular line length and meter

A Touch of Green

A Touch of Green

A Touch of Green

Winter meant bare branches along this stream.
At last, the trees are green along this stream.

And with it, the entire scene seems to come
to life as I slowly paddle downstream.

Swallows dash about for food, their hatchlings
in the nests that line the banks of the stream.

Brown squirrels gambol along maple branches,
hanging perilously above the stream.

Heron stares keenly into the water,
waiting patiently for fish in the stream.

A pair of deer walk nimbly down the bank,
pause at water’s edge to drink from the stream.

Bass breaks the water with a splash to catch
bugs flying lazily above the stream.

Sights and sounds that accompany the green
help me understand life along the stream.

The optional prompt at NaPoWriMo 2017 for Day 13 of National Poetry Writing Month/Global Poetry Writing Month is to write a ghazal. I’ve written a couple using my name in the final line, as is an option. But with a name like mine (Ken) that can grow old fast, so I hope you’ll understand why I’ve used a variant. 😉
Ghazal ~ five or more couplets, lines the same length, meter not required
~ first couplet same end words; 1 to 3 words in 2nd lines repeated; rhyme – aA bA cA dA eA
~ (optional) internal rhyme in second lines, preceding repeated rhyme
~ possible naming or reference to author in last couplet
~ traditionally invoking melancholy, love, longing, and metaphysical questions, ghazals are often sung by Iranian, Indian, and Pakistani musicians

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Ghazals Revised

It comes to my attention that, in my first and second attempts, I misinterpreted the rules for writing a ghazal. I thought the first couplet is composed of two lines with end rhyme. In fact, the intention is for both lines to have the same end word, or words, as the second lines of the couplets that follow.
Considering that, I have revised the first couplets of those two poems so that each is a true ghazal.

Unwelcome Dawn

The dawn would come upon this night,
Repair my soul and end this night

Despite my loss, and with it pain
I don’t care to upend this night

But then, there are those close to me
Who say I should suspend this night

They see the darkness over me
Concerned for how I spend this night

Their words may hold a bit of truth
But I still hope to mend this night

So I must look within myself
With hope that I may ken this night


Inner Light 

These words are born within my heart
With warmth that’s held within my heart

The darkness that had taken root
And made its home within this heart

Would suffocate and take all life
That once had been within this heart

But then you came and with your light
Did shine true love within this heart

Fueled by the warmth there in your heart
I hold you close within this heart

Most willingly I keep that love
Now in my ken, within this heart


Ghazal
   ~ five or more couplets, lines the same length, meter not required
   ~ first couplet same end words; 1 to 3 words in 2nd lines repeated; rhyme – aA bA cA dA eA
   ~ (optional) internal rhyme in second lines, preceding repeated rhyme
   ~ possible naming or reference to author in last couplet
   ~ traditionally invoking melancholy, love, longing, and metaphysical questions, ghazals are          often sung by Iranian, Indian, and Pakistani musicians

Sound Stream

Sound Stream

Sound Stream

Wary turtle silently
slips into the water.
Rattling kingfisher
dives with a splash,
carries its prize away.

Cardinal calls,
flashing red in its trill.
Woodpecker’s rat-a-tat-tat
sounds a counter note.
Splash of catfish tail
carries across the water.

Spring speaks to me,
sitting still
against the bank,
my kayak tucked
beneath an outcrop.

Just two miles out of town,
yet far from civilization.
No sign of Man.
My own presence
insignificant.

Such is Nature.

 

The optional prompt at NaPoWriMo 2017 for Day 12 of National Poetry Writing Month/Global Poetry Writing Month is to write a poem that explicitly incorporates alliteration.
Image: Moreau River, Missouri

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